5 Things to know About Meditation

Meditation is a hot topic these days, but there are a lot of misconceptions of what it's for and how to do it. Here are 5 tips that might help you settle on a habit.

5 things to know about meditation

Meditation is a hot topic these days, but there are a lot of misconceptions of what it's for and how to do it. Here are some tips that might help you settle on a habit.

Meditation is not about stopping your thoughts.

You can never stop your thoughts, nor would you want to! Meditation is about creating a new relationship to your thoughts. Seeing how they come and go, kind of like the weather, and how they change over time.

It's normal to feel frustrated with your "monkey mind" β€” it can be hard to bear witness to how busy and hectic it is in there.

But over time, you learn to accept that that's just how the mind works, and the process gets easier. (Which in turn may make your mind a bit clearer!)

The point of meditation is to get to know yourself.

To learn to listen to yourself despite all the other competing information and stimuli that comes from the outside. You can think of it as a sort of mental hygiene β€” over time, you start to see yourself more clearly, and to be better in touch with your wants and needs.

You don't have to be perfect to meditate.

Even people who've been meditating for decades talk about how their mind is all over the place. It's a practice that lasts a lifetime, so don't get discouraged if you miss days or weeks or months. You can always come back to it.

There are many styles and traditions of meditation.

Pick a meditation style that sparks your curiosity, and if at all possible, try meditating with a group, whether in person or via Zoom. It's much easier to do it with other people than it is to do alone.

Written by Sara Campbell. Sara is a writer, communications strategist, and coach whose main project is Tiny Revolutions, a newsletter about becoming who you are. Rooted in her practice of Zen Buddhism, it’s for anyone who wants to be more awake, alive, and connected to the truth of their life β€” and to the world around them.